Friday, April 24, 2015

Whole-Grain Blueberry Scones – Because a “Muffsconut” Isn’t a Thing

I was brainstorming some ideas for using up a cup of nearly perfect blueberries, and was waffling between muffins, donuts, and biscuits. I finally decided on a biscuit-like triangle, spiced subtly with essence of old-fashioned donut.

I’m calling it a scone because I cut it into a triangle. There’s just something un-American about a triangular biscuit, so you Brits will just have to keep a stiff upper lip about this not being an actual scone.

I used my new favorite, sprouted spelt flour, but I’m guessing this will work with whatever you roll with. You’ll also want to keep an eye on them in the oven, as the baking times will vary depending on the exact shape and thickness. They’re done when they’re well browned, and you see blueberry juices bubbling out though the top and sides.

These have that someone loves me look, especially if you do the recommended sugar-crust top, which is why I’m thinking these would be nice for Mother’s Day, or any other brunch/breakfast-in-bed type situations. I hope you give these a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 8 Whole-Grain Blueberry Scones:
2 cups spelt flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1 tsp fine salt
1/8 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
2 tbsp white sugar, optional
4 ounces ice cold butter (1/2 cup aka 1 stick) 
1 cup blueberries
3/4 cup cold buttermilk
- 425F.for about 25 minutes

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Greek Lemon Chicken and Potatoes – Both Homers Would Love This

I don’t have the energy or courage to cater for a living, but if I did, this Greek lemon chicken and potatoes would be one of my go-to entrees, and not just for big, fat weddings. It’s a proven crowd-pleaser, simple to make, and easy on the wallet.

I had a whole chicken to use, but I really like to do this with all leg/thigh sections, which can roast longer, and that means even more caramelized goodness. If you do use a whole chicken, you can remove the breast sections from the roasting pan before the thighs, and cook the dark meat longer, but I couldn’t be bothered, and the results were delicious.

The extra potato crusting is an optional step, as is turning the drippings into a quick sauce, but both only take a few minutes, and really elevate the dish. Like I said at the end of the clip, this is something I could easily make once a week, and the leftovers are extremely picnic friendly. I hope you give this a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 4 Portions Greek Lemon Chicken and Potatoes:
1 whole chicken, about 4 pound, cut in sections,
OR 4 pounds chicken thighs bone-in, skin-on
3 russet potatoes, cut in quarters
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tsp dried rosemary
1 rounded tablespoon dried oregano
pinch of cayenne
6 cloves of garlic, finely minced
1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
1/2 cup olive oil
2/3 cup chicken broth for the pan, plus a splash to deglaze after roasting
fresh chopped oregano to garnish
Roast at 425 for about 45 minutes, or until the chicken is well browned and cooked through.

Monday, April 20, 2015

A Spring Vegetable Frittata for Mother

It always feels a little wrong making a frittata with freshly cooked vegetables, since the whole point of the dish is to use up leftovers, but seeing as we’re branding this as a Mother’s Day brunch special, we’ll make an exception.

If you want to play it safe, you can cook each vegetable separately, but that takes longer than the one-after-the-other method shown here. Like I said in the video, this is a great practice recipe for new cooks, since you really have to pay attention to what’s happening in the pan. I said to use medium heat, but you may want to adjust that up and down, depending on what you see happening.

Make sure all your vegetables are tender, hot, and well seasoned before adding your eggs, and not a lot can go wrong. Once those, and hopefully some cheese, get stirred in, turn off the heat, and pop the pan into the oven until the eggs are set. If your mom likes golden-brown, you can use the optional broiling step seen herein.

If you decide to garnish with edible flowers, make sure you’re actually using edible flowers. Nothing puts a damper on a Mother’s Day brunch like a trip to the emergency room. If you use nasturtium you’ll be safe, otherwise, do some research. I really hope you give this delicious vegetable frittata a try soon. Enjoy!


Makes 6 large portions:
2 tbsp olive oil
1 leek, chopped
1 jalapeno, seeded, diced
1 1/2 cups sliced asparagus
1 1/2 cups sliced zucchini
handful baby spinach
1 1/2 cups sliced cooked potatoes
12 large eggs
1 tsp salt, plus more as needed to taste while cooking veggies
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
pinch cayenne
4 ounces goat milk feta, or your favorite cheese
350 F. for about 15 minutes, or until just set, then broil on high for 1-2 minutes for some color

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Asparagus Season is the Reason

Is there any more representative image of Spring than a couple ladybugs making love on a spear of asparagus?

This great photo by Flickr user Benimoto inspired me to
post a few links to some previously published asparagus recipes.

One of my biggest vegetable pet-peeves is undercooked asparagus. Many cooks are so afraid to overcook it, they tend to not cook it long enoug
h, and this results in a still bitter stalk. There's a perfect degree of doneness where the spears are just tender, and the natural sweetness shines through. So, go buy a couple bunches of fresh asparagus, and give one of these recipes a try. Enjoy!


Asparagus and Chicken Noodle Casserole

Creamy Fresh Asparagus Pizza (note: uses old, original pizza dough recipe)

Pan-seared Spring Asparagus with Lemon, Balsamic and Parmesan

Pasta Primavera with Fresh Asparagus

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